Make a Reservation

 Toll Free: 877 562 9919  | 

 Turtles Conservation

Get to know the turtles in our “backyard”

Five species of sea turtles are found swimming in Florida's waters and nesting on Florida's beaches. Of these five species three (Loggerhead, Green, and Leatherback) are prevalent along the shores of Indian River County and found in our “backyard”. For more information about the biology of these three species click here.  All sea turtles found in Florida are protected under state statutes.

SEA TURTLES AS OUR NEIGHBORS

Sea turtles have roamed the oceans for millions of years. During their wanderings, adult females faithfully return every couple of years to lay their eggs in Florida Beaches. A sea turtle will lay about 112 eggs in a nest (also known as a clutch) and she will nest multiple - times during a nesting season. About 55 days later the eggs hatch. The hatchlings emerge from the nest and dash to the sea. Only about 1 in 1,000 hatchlings survive to adulthood. Those that do survive will return to the same beaches to lay their eggs as adults some 30-40 years later. Thus good stewardship of Florida’s beaches is critical to successive generations of sea turtles.

LIGHT DISORIENTATION IN NESTING ADULTS

Artificial lighting affects the nesting of female sea turtles. Studies have shown that brightly lighted beaches are less frequently used as nesting sites. In addition, females attempting to return to the sea after nesting  can be lead astray by nearby lighting just like hatchlings.

You can help protect the sea turtles that nest on our shore by closing draperies after 9pm to shield indoor light from shining out of your room at night and turning off your balcony light after 9pm.

You can help protect the sea turtles that nest on our shore by closing draperies after 9pm to shield indoor light from shining out of your room at night and turning off your balcony light after 9pm.

LIGHT DISORIENTATION IN HATCHLINGS

On beaches where artificial lighting is visible, the hatchlings' important journey to the sea is disrupted. Hatchling sea turtles emerging from nests at night are strongly attracted to the brightest horizon.  In the absence of artificial light, this is the moon and star light reflecting off the water.  Light sources along the beach attract hatchlings towards the land. Consequently, hatchlings move toward any visible artificial light (such as streetlights, porch lights or interior lights) and often die as a result of wandering inland. 

You can help protect the sea turtles that nest on our shore by closing draperies after 9pm to shield indoor light from shining out of your room at night and turning off your balcony light after 9pm.

LIGHT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

There are ways that Costa d’Este Beach Resort & Spa guests can modify their lights to prevent them from being seen from the beach between March 1st and October 31st each year. Please help us protect these magnificent creatures by remembering a few simple things.

  • Shield indoor light from shining out of your room at night by closing draperies after 9pm.
  • Turn off your balcony light after 9pm